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instagram:

Bringing Taxidermy Back to Life with @chipito

To see more of Chipito’s surrealist taxidermy scenes, follow @chipito on Instagram.

"Bringing things that are not meant to be together into one image creates a new, disrupted story that hopefully inspires people," says Chipito (@chipito), the anonymous alter ego of two Belgian creative directors.

Chipito’s haunting, surreal photos bring together a love of photography, a desire to explore abandoned locations and a fascination with taxidermy that stretches back 25 years. “Our home is like a giant Wunderkammer,” Chipito explains. “It’s an inexhaustible source of inspiration.”

The jarring masked figures, says Chipito, are supposed to make the viewer feel a sense of unease. “We’ve always been passionate about controversy and curiosities, ” he says. “The ugliness is a reaction against the overdose of beauty in the media, and the masks against the voyeurism of social media and government surveillance.”

Creativities!

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styleisstyle:

Ken Russel’s Last of the Teddy Girls

"Russell scouts the streets of post-war London and takes both candid and posed shots of young girls dressed in the classic teddy girl uniform: blazers, trousers and ‘manly’ haircuts. It was one of the first of its kind as portraying the youth culture which, in the 1950s, was just getting underway." TRIBU Magazine Article

always reblog. teddy girls are always a sartorial reference point for me.

#teddy girls in the war.

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instagram:

Adventures in Doll Making with @Tilly2Milly

For more photos and videos from Davorka’s dolls in London, follow @tilly2milly on Instagram.

For London Instagrammer Davorka Andjelic (@tilly2milly), Instagram is a playful home to document the travels of her many handmade dolls. The dolls started life in the classroom where Davorka works as a teaching assistant. Inspired by the creativity of the young children she worked with—”their sweet natures and rosy cheeks”—she began to experiment with different materials.

"Making my dolls is a journey," she says. "I love the fact that at the beginning of the process I don’t have clear vision about the finished doll." To create the dolls, Davorka finds an outfit and parts for the face from old magazines. Next, she creates a base from cardboard and the Financial Times's iconic salmon-pink newspaper.

Davorka takes the dolls with her around her home in Hampstead, North London, as well as on her travels from the colorful streets of Brick Lane to fisherman huts along the English coast at Dungeness headland in Kent.

"The biggest compliment for me is when people say my photos remind them of their childhood," Davorka says. "I love the innocence of early years and strongly believe adults should ‘play’ as well. I hope my photos inspire people to dig out old photos and experience them in new light."